Monday, August 1, 2011

History of faith


What is faith? Or what kind of faith do we talk about when we deal with matters of faith in Christianity? The answer will be neither easy nor simple. But we have to consider complexities involved with the concept of faith because no word or concept is made out of context. When I wrote my book, A Theological Introduction to Paul’s Letters: Exploring a Threefold Theology of Paul (Cascade Books, 2011), one of my concerns has to do with the familiar notion of faith. The following is an excerpt from my book, page 64:

Excursus: “History of Faith”
“The Hebrew word for faith is emunah (for example, Hab 2:4: “The one who is righteous shall live by faith”), whose basic meaning has to do with faithful­ness, fidelity, or steadfastness. All of these involve a person’s cost and time, as Abraham paid such a price in living his lifelong journey of steadfastness to God. In the New Testament, the Greek word for faith is pistis, whose ba­sic meaning also has to do with faithfulness, fidelity, or commitment. … One of the problems in English translation is that there is no equivalent English verb for the Greek verb pisteuo, whose noun is pistis (faith). The closest thing in English might be a form like “faithize.” … …

For more, read A Theological Introduction to Paul’s Letters: Exploring a Threefold Theology of Paul (Cascade Books, 2011), p. 64. Visit the book information page too.